Is this YOU? If yes, then you could be carrying this in your body…

Dear Friend,

Did you know that the most common disease in the world is something most of us haven’t even heard of, yet it affects a whopping 2.1 BILLION PEOPLE?

That means there’s a 1 in 3 chance that YOU have it. 

So if you value your health, I’d suggest that you take a few moments to answer the following questions:

  • Do you often feel tired or weak?Tired
  • Do you sometimes experience back pain, abdominal pain or lower torso discomfort?
  • Do you ever feel nauseous or suffer from a loss of appetite?
  • Does your skin or the whites of your eyes appear yellowish in color? 
  • Do you binge drink, or drink alcohol on a regular basis? 
  • Are you overweight and struggling to shift those excess pounds? 
  • Have you noticed a patchy, dark skin discoloration, usually on the neck or underarm area? 
  • Do you have bad skin, and just don’t know why? 
  • Do you ever suffer from abdominal pains and cramping?
  • Do you suffer from headaches, or experience confusion, impaired judgment, or have trouble concentrating?
  • Do you always feel hungry, and as a result, are constantly snacking on sugary or starchy foods? 

And finally…

  • Do you have a general feeling of ill health, and can’t figure out what it might be? 

If you answered “YES” to any of those questions, then you’re exactly in the right place…Because you could be suffering from the effects of a “FATTY LIVER”

Photo by Eugen Buzuk on Pexels.com

4 Risk Factors of Alcohol-Related Fatty Liver Disease (ALD)

There’s primarily one risk factor for developing alcohol-related fatty liver disease (ALD): the consumption of alcohol. 

So who is most likely to become an alcoholic drinker? Psychological studies show that those who are dependent on alcohol are people who can’t say no to an extra drink, or the first drink at all. Here’s a list of people who are most likely to become dependent on it:

  • Young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 The statistic of those in this age range who binge drink – a habit that can easily lead to fatty liver disease – is as high as 41%. 
  • Those who tend to be impulsive Someone who is impulsive will tend to try something on a whim. If friends are encouraging a person to drink all day at a get-together, someone who is impulsive might be more apt to do exactly that. He or she may be in a home situation where feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, frustration and being trapped have been coming up recently, making an impulsive person even more impulsive. 
  • Those who are influenced by a peer group Those who are influenced by friends are less apt to stand up for what they believe when the peer pressure is applied.
  • Those whose parents drank while they observed the behavior Watching a parent drink and treat family members poorly is nothing that a child wants to watch. A child can make a decision to never be like the offending parent but then later in life, finds himself or herself walking in the parent’s footsteps. Counseling helps a lot in these cases.
  • Those who have had a previous history of drug abuse, and are going through a rough time in their life Stress brings out the worst in us. A previous history of abusing drugs or alcohol can be ‘relived’ when times get hard, making a person turn to alcohol. 
  • Those who received accolades for drinking large amounts of alcohol Getting praised by one’s friends and talked about as if “you’re the man” is a good feeling. But when that feeling is associated with alcohol, it starts a neural pathway in the brain that links happiness with alcohol. This link has to be broken if you are going to give up alcohol, something that is essential to reverse fatty liver. Replacing the happiness with a disgusted feeling (such as imagining maggots in the alcoholic drinks) is an old trick that psychologists and hypnotherapists use to break bad habits.

If you recognize that you could be at risk to develop fatty liver disease as a result of your personal drinking habits, the best choice of health practitioner to see is a psychologist. 



Eating Habits That Contribute to a Fatty Liver

According to studies, your diet is closely tied in with the creation of fatty liver. That’s what researchers worldwide are reporting in their research. Thus, by reversing your eating habits that are out of alignment with healthy eating, you can then prevent and reverse fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease is reversible if you attack it with good nutrition in its early stages.

Below is a list of 11 eating habits to make sure you are already including in your daily routines:

1 Stop eating processed fats and hydrogenated fats.
Check the labels of the foods you are eating; when you see hydrogenated fats on the list, discard the food. It’s contributing to the promotion of a fatty liver. 

2 Replace your vegetable oils with olive oil and coconut oil.
The most easily oxidized oils are the vegetable oils (corn, safflower, vegetable, soy, canola) because they are not stable; their chemical composition makes them subject to breakdown by light and heat. Eliminating these oils from your diet helps preserve your antioxidant levels.

3 Stop eating sugar and sugary foods.
Sugar affects your immunity, your metabolism, and your blood sugar levels. It also is a sure way to gain weight. When blood sugar levels aren’t stable, metabolic syndrome occurs. Metabolic syndrome is tied closely with fatty liver disease.

4 If you’re drinking coffee, make sure it’s organic.
Non-organic coffee is loaded with chemicals and pesticides. Non-organic decaffeinated coffee is additionally loaded with nickel. The more toxins you consume, the harder you make your liver work.

5 Eat healthy protein foods, in serving sizes.
Eating 4 ounces protein (chicken, fish, beef, buffalo, wild meats, pork, poultry) twice daily is not excessive. Don’t fear red meat; fear only the overconsumption of commercially grown red meats. When cattle consume a diet based on corn, it alters the composition of the fats in the meat. However, there is nothing wrong with grass fed beef.

6 Take supplements that correct any nutritional deficiencies you might have.
Nutritional deficiencies, such as methionine, choline, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, and vitamin E are tied to fatty liver. You need all vitamins and minerals, not just some of them. Take a good program of supplements. 

7 Make sure antioxidants are amongst your current supplements.
The antioxidants vitamin C, E and A have been shown in the research to be medically important to prevent and reverse fatty liver. 

8 Stop the alcohol.
Alcoholic drinks cause fatty liver disease. 

9 Stop eating rancid nuts, especially peanuts.
Nuts that are rancid often contain the mold aspergillus, which creates the toxin aflatoxin. Peanuts are notorious for their high content of aflatoxin. Aflatoxin kills liver cells. 

10 Don’t overeat foods with saturated fats.
Foods with saturated fats are more stable in the body than unsaturated (vegetable oils) but you can still eat too many of them. Don’t overeat them.

11 Avoid the salty foods.
High amounts of salt place an extra burden on the body and especially the liver. You need a pinch of salt each day, but not much more than that. 

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